Spotlight: A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin

Spotlight is my weekly feature in which I highlight a book I’m really looking forward to or really enjoyed.  This week it’s A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin, a book it seems everyone is talking about.

A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin

In A Game of Thrones, George R. R. Martin has created a genuine masterpiece, bringing together the best the genre has to offer.  Mystery, intrigue, romance, and adventure fill the pages of the first volume in an epic series sure to delight fantasy fans everywhere.

In a land where summers can last decades and winters a lifetime, trouble is brewing.  The cold is returning, and in the frozen wastes to the North of Winterfell, sinister and supernatural forces are massing beyond the kingdom’s protective Wall.  At the center of the conflict lie the Starks of Winterfell, a family as harsh and unyielding as the land they were born to.  Sweeping from a land of brutal cold to a distant summertime kingdom of epicurean plenty, here is a tale of lords and ladies, soldiers and sorcerers, assassins and bastards, who come together in a time of grim omens.  Amid plots and counterplots, tragedy and betrayal, victory and terror, the fate of the Starks, their allies, and their enemies hangs perilously in the balance, as each endeavors to win that deadliest of conflicts: the game of thrones.

Is A Game of Thrones the best fantasy book ever published like some claim?  No, not really.  But is it a good book?  Certainly!

I love to get lost in a good book, especially when it’s epic fantasy, so George Martin’s book was a great escape for me lately.  Being propelled into a world where dragons once existed and where winters can last for years was quite the change from the swath of realistic and historical fiction I’ve read lately.  I haven’t curled up with a good fantasy book in a while and if you haven’t either, I’d highly recommend A Game of Thrones.

The world-building is pretty good, but it’s definitely the characters that made me want to highlight this book.  The Starks are obviously the main attraction since the saga follows them, but characters like Tyrion Lannister will make you see both sides of the conflict.  Of course there are the ‘bad’ characters as well, but they’re not all they seem as well.  Cersei, the Queen of Westeros, seems to be your stereotypical Evil Queen, but it’s her background story that makes her oddly sympathetic to me.

I don’t want to give too much away, but if you like characters with actual depth and long, intertwined narratives, you’ll love A Game of Thrones.

2 comments

    • Carrie Slager

      It’s probably a good thing he’s willing to do away with important characters. I’m only just reading the second book and I’ve noticed a problem with character bloat–there’s almost too many narrative threads to follow as he tries to give everyone their page time.

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